Sunday, December 4, 2016

Reasons behind American Government should banned child shooting Games and Youtube Videos.


Its very funny to watch how educated stupid people make shooting youtube videos for entertainment and the core audience are Child. Nowadays more than thousands games exit online about shooting.
My question is what the hell these innocent children are learning?  Is it all about shooting and how to shoot, use gun and kill someone. Should it be a part of entertainment for these innocent children. Somehow they adopt some nature for this way of environment and they try it in real life and some of the incident happen. Why not we create awareness about it?
Every year the shooting rate is increasing in many area mostly in USA its increasing rapidly. It's very joky to understand that no one is going to take any action to improve this area of entrainment.
Thousand of ways still exist except this child shooting Games and Youtube Videos. I think USA government and all conscious people across the globe should think about this sector and give a finest and coolest environment for our children.

California warehouse fire kills at least nine at dance party

A woman cries as she brings flowers near the scene of a warehouse where a fire broke out during an electronic dance party late Friday evening, resulting in at least nine deaths and many unaccounted for in the Fruitvale district of Oakland, California, U.S. December 3, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
By Rory Carroll and Curtis Skinner | OAKLAND, CALIF.
A fire that roared through a warehouse dance party in Oakland, California, killed more than nine people and left at least two dozen others missing and feared dead inside the gutted building, officials said on Saturday, as anguished friends and relatives awaited word of their fate.

The cause of the blaze and precise number of casualties remained undetermined hours after flames engulfed the two-story, structure that occupied about half a city block and housed a cluttered warren of artists' studios, craft booths, antiques and furniture.

The blaze started at about 11:30 p.m. on Friday in the city's Fruitvale district, a mostly Latino, blue-collar area that is also home to many artists living and working in converted lofts.
Oakland and Alameda County officials said they expected to find more victims once the burned-out ruins of the building were fully shored up and recovery crews were able to safely comb through the structure's charred interior.

City Fire Chief Teresa Deloach Reed, said the blaze marked the worst single-structure fire she had seen in her career. Mayor Libby Schaaf called it a "devastating scene."

Shaken friends of the missing huddled at a nearby pub waiting for word on possible victims, while about a dozen others gathered at a neighborhood sheriff's station seeking news.

“I don’t have high hopes,” said a woman with four friends among the missing, declining to give her name. “We’ve just spent the night calling hospitals and listening to police scanners.

Parents and others shared contact information on a Facebook page and asked anyone with information about the missing to call. "ANY information please!" wrote a woman looking for her son.

Nine fatalities were initially confirmed, and authorities were "expecting the worst" as they sought to account for "a couple of dozen" people who were reported missing, Sergeant Ray Kelly, a spokesman for the county sheriff, told an afternoon news conference.

He later clarified that at least two dozen people remained unaccounted for Saturday night besides the nine victims whose remains were initially found and recovered from the rubble. Those bodies were transported to the coroner's bureau for identification.

He said an additional, unspecified number of bodies have since been spotted in the compromised structure but had not been reached.
Oakland and Alameda County officials said they expected to find more victims once the burned-out ruins of the building were fully shored up and recovery crews were able to safely comb through the structure's charred interior.

City Fire Chief Teresa Deloach Reed, said the blaze marked the worst single-structure fire she had seen in her career. Mayor Libby Schaaf called it a "devastating scene."

Shaken friends of the missing huddled at a nearby pub waiting for word on possible victims, while about a dozen others gathered at a neighborhood sheriff's station seeking news.

“I don’t have high hopes,” said a woman with four friends among the missing, declining to give her name. “We’ve just spent the night calling hospitals and listening to police scanners.

Parents and others shared contact information on a Facebook page and asked anyone with information about the missing to call. "ANY information please!" wrote a woman looking for her son.

Nine fatalities were initially confirmed, and authorities were "expecting the worst" as they sought to account for "a couple of dozen" people who were reported missing, Sergeant Ray Kelly, a spokesman for the county sheriff, told an afternoon news conference.

He later clarified that at least two dozen people remained unaccounted for Saturday night besides the nine victims whose remains were initially found and recovered from the rubble. Those bodies were transported to the coroner's bureau for identification.

He said an additional, unspecified number of bodies have since been spotted in the compromised structure but had not been reached.
'LIKE A CONCRETE KILN'

Authorities have said they did not know how many people were at the party or how many lived on the premises.

But one eyewitness, who said he left the party to buy liquor and returned to find flames shooting from the second floor, said on Twitter that he saw about 60 to 70 people in the building.

"It was an inferno," Seung Y. Lee recounted in a post on his verified Twitter account.

Lee, who declined an interview, tweeted that the entire first floor was "covered in wood - antiques, furniture, etc. Beautiful but labyrinthine." He also described the wooden stairway as rickety and hazardous.

A Facebook event page showed 176 people planned to attend the party.

Ben Koss, an Oakland resident and musician, told Reuters he was on his way to the party with friends and arrived late to find smoke billowing from the warehouse moments before firefighters arrived.

"We tore down a fence so people could get out, but nobody came out," he said. "It was like a concrete kiln."

A few dozen mourners assembled Saturday night at the Church of the Chimes, about 7 miles (11 km) from the fire scene, to offer prayers for the dead and missing.

(Additional reporting by Peter Henderson in Oakland, Dan Whitcomb and Sue Horton in Los Angeles, Letitia Stein in Tampa, Florida, and David Bailey in Minneapolis; Writing by Frank McGurty and Steve Gorman; Editing by Tom Brown and Mary Milliken)
This article first seeen on reuters

Friday, December 2, 2016

Bangladesh November reserves slip from record high

Via: Sachtimes
Dec 1 Bangladesh's foreign exchange reserves edged down to $31.37 billion at the end of November from a record high of $31.90 billion the previous month, but were up 14 percent from a year earlier, the central bank said on Thursday.

The monthly drop was fuelled by a rise in imports, a senior central bank official said, adding that the reserves were sufficient to cover about nine months' worth of imports.

Last month, Bangladesh's central bank retrieved just under a fifth of the $81 million looted in February from its account at the New York Federal Reserve, which then went missing in Manila, after one of the biggest bank frauds ever.

Steady garment exports and remittances from Bangladesh nationals working overseas, the key drivers of a more than $200 billion economy, have helped build reserves in recent years. (Reporting by Ruma Paul; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)
This article first seeen on reuters

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Callers for dollars: Inside India's scam call centers

Police escort men who they said were arrested on Wednesday on suspicion of tricking American citizens into sending them money by posing as U.S. tax officials, at a court in Thane, on the outskirts of Mumbai, India, October 6, 2016. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui/File Photo

By Rajendra Jadhav, Euan Rocha and Rahul Bhatia | MUMBAI
In late September, a woman in National City, California, received a voice message on her phone saying she was in trouble with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) over "tax evasion or tax fraud".

Panicking, she rang the number and told a man who said he was from the IRS: "I can pay $500," half the sum demanded. "I could do a payment plan. I just can't pay all of it at once."

"Ma'am, you can pay $500 today itself. You can do that?" the man asked, adding that lawyers would look at her accounts and work out a monthly payment plan, but she had to pay half now.

In transcripts of the conversation that investigators shared with Reuters, the man told her to keep the phone line open and drive to a nearby grocery store, where she bought $500 worth of iTunes gift cards and gave the 'agent' the redemption codes.

She had just been scammed - one of at least 15,000 people the U.S. Justice Department says lost more than $300 million in an "enormous and complex fraud" running since 2013. The department last month brought grand jury charges against 56 people in India and the United States for "telefraud" scams run from fake call centers in India.

Investigators have arrested 20 people in the United States, and Indian authorities have made 75 arrests following October raids on three premises in the Thane suburb of Mumbai. Charges include conspiracy to commit identity theft, impersonation of an officer of the United States, wire fraud and money laundering.

Indian police say they are looking for Sagar Thakkar, a man in his early 30s also known as Shaggy, who they believe masterminded the scam. Thakkar was also among those named by the U.S. Department of Justice. Reuters was unable to contact Thakkar for comment; he is not known to have a lawyer, and police believe he fled to Dubai last month.

"We are trying to complete the procedure to issue a red corner notice for Thakkar," Parag Manere, a deputy commissioner at Thane police, told Reuters, referring to an Interpol arrest warrant.

Police said Thakkar led a lavish lifestyle, frequenting 5-star hotels and driving expensive cars with proceeds from the scam. He gave one, a 25 million rupee ($365,000) Audi R8, to his girlfriend. "We have seized an Audi car, and are trying to find other assets of Thakkar," Manere said.

The FBI, which is involved in the investigations, declined to comment. The Department of Justice did not respond to requests for comment for this article. At a news conference last month, Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell said the U.S. would seek the extradition of suspects in India, and warned others engaged in similar schemes they could face jail terms.

In interviews before the U.S. charges were filed, police, suspects and call center workers in India told Reuters how the scam was run.

Training materials and taped conversations, which investigators believe were made by call center instructors for training purposes, shed some light on an operation aimed to exploit the aged and gullible.

"TAUGHT TO BE TOUGH"

"The revenue was unpredictable. Some days were good, some were bad," Haider Ali Ayub Mansuri, who said he managed operations at one fake call center, told Reuters as he was returned to jail in India last month after a court extended his custody. He is among the 75 arrested by Indian police.

"On a good day, we extracted as much as $20,000 from a single U.S. citizen," he said.

In India, the sheer scale of the operation surprised many.

For months, hundreds of young men and women worked nights at several call centers in Thane. Callers posed as IRS officers and threatened their victims, often newly-arrived immigrants and the elderly, into paying fictitious tax penalties electronically - sometimes by buying gift cards and turning over the redemption codes, Indian investigators said.

"They used to blast out pre-recorded messages to thousands of citizens who were asked to call back. When they called back, there was a center just like this," said Manere at Thane police.

Acting on a tip-off, police raided premises in early October as call center workers settled in for their shift. The buildings housed seven call centers, and over a few days more than 700 people were detained. Most have since been released, but told not to leave the city.

Callers bullied their victims with the threat of arrest, jail, seized homes and confiscated passports.

"There was one instance where an old lady was crying," because she didn't have the money to pay, said a former call center worker who spoke only on condition of anonymity. "But we kept insisting on the money. We were taught to be tough," he told Reuters.
On a follow-up raid in Ahmedabad, 500 kms (310 miles) north of Mumbai, police uncovered what they believe was "a nerve center for these centers," said Manere. "A lot of money has been transacted. It's been going on for a few years."

The police raids found little in the way of documentation, beyond some training materials. Another former worker said this was likely because call center managers stopped employees from bringing pens and phones to work.
Reuters was unable to independently confirm the accounts provided by call center workers.

WEEKLY INCENTIVES

Another former worker, an economics graduate, told Reuters she took a job without knowing what the center did. The 12,000 rupee ($180) monthly salary was well below the going rate for a graduate, she said, but it was a job, and "people aren't hiring."

She said several of her colleagues looked as though they had just left high school.
Her first week was spent in training with floor managers. While callers spoke to their victims, she said dozens of trainees squeezed in around the room, and had to memorize pages of dialogue for use on calls.

Another former employee said his instructors told him his work was illegal, but there was "nothing to worry about."

Callers made "fast money", another former caller told Reuters. In comments confirmed by investigating officer Mukund Hatote, the worker said: "For every dollar you brought in, you were given 2 rupees (around a third of a U.S. cent)."

People wanted to leave rather than be involved in something they suspected was illegal, he said, but carried on because managers offered weekly incentives, such as cash or gadgets, for meeting their targets.

(Reporting by Rajendra Jadhav, Euan Rocha and Rahul Bhatia; Writing by Rahul Bhatia; Editing by Ian Geoghegan)
This article first seeen on reuters

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Job Circulation from UBER in Bangladesh


Position: Operations Coordinator - Dhaka
City Operations, Operations & Launch in Dhaka, Bangladesh

We are seeking a sharp, personable, highly-organized Operations Coordinator to support City Operations. This is an opportunity to work with a stellar operations team on the daily functions that are at the core of Uber.
What You’ll Do:

  • Be the voice and face of Uber. Manage in-person communications (both 1-1 and 1-many) between Uber and its driver community.
  • Contribute to rapid growth. Work onsite to manage the process of on boarding new drivers and support existing partners.
  • Be a process master. Constantly innovate and iterate to ensure maximum productivity in our processes.
  • Manage efficiency. Plan, track, order, and disburse equipment to driver partners.
  • Help us scale faster. Work closely with the driver operations and logistics teams to streamline process.
Read More: Dhaka, Your Uber Is Arriving Now…

What You’ll Need:

  • B.A. or B.Tech. (Recent graduates encouraged to apply!)
  • Strong communication skills and ability to interact with internal and external partners
  • Superior organisational skills and great follow through on tasks
  • Be a problem solver at heart with a genuine interest in learning by doing
  • An interest in and passion for Uber
Perks:
  • Employees are given Uber credits each month.
  • Ground floor opportunity with the team; shape the strategic direction of the company.
  • The rare opportunity to change the world such that everyone around you is using the product you built. We’re not just another social web app, we’re moving real people and assets and reinventing transportation and logistics globally.
  • Sharp, motivated co-workers in a fun office environment.
Click Here to Apply Link

Friday, November 25, 2016

Up in the Air: Life Lessons from Richard Branson

Founder of Virgin Group Richard Branson speaks on a panel titled ''Drug Policy: Time for a Re-Think?'' at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, October 26, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
By Chris Taylor | NEW YORK
Who, if anyone, on this planet is living their best life? The shortlist of candidates would have to include Richard Branson.

The British billionaire and founder of the Virgin group of companies not only makes a very good living, but he seems to be having a hell of a time doing it.

A new documentary on Branson's hot-air ballooning adventures titled "Don't Look Down," is being released in select theaters on Nov. 11.

For the latest in Reuters' "Life Lessons" series, Branson gives a few pointers on embracing a high-risk, high-reward life.

Q: Your parents encouraged your taste for adventure. What life lessons did they pass along to you?

A: When I was around five years old, my mum stopped three miles from our home and told me to find my own way back. Granted she was punishing me for causing mischief in the back seat, but her goal was to teach me how to overcome my shyness and ask others for directions.

Q: Are your risky ballooning adventures an apt metaphor for how you approach business?

A: My escapades in "Don’t Look Down," are certainly high-risk. We needed to find a way to promote our new airline. I think Joan, the kids and my parents might have been happy if I had found a way not to fly the world's biggest-ever hot air balloon in a jet stream across the Atlantic Ocean. However, my sense of adventure got the better of me, and these ballooning adventures helped put Virgin on the map.

Q: The film begins with the story of the almost accidental launching of Virgin Air. What did that experience teach you about entrepreneurship?

A: The moment of inspiration came from a time when I was stranded in the British Virgin Islands. I had a beautiful lady waiting for me, but the airline had canceled the flight as there were not enough passengers. As a joke, I grabbed a chalkboard and wrote BVI one-way $39. Then I wrote 'Virgin Airlines' on the top. I found all the passengers who had been bumped and filled up my first plane. Moments of frustration are often a spark of brilliant ideas and solutions.

Q: What are your strategies for handling wealth?

A: Reinvest the money you make to improve your existing company. Keep your eyes open for new sectors or countries to expand in. We started in music and retail, but used our success there to create many different businesses beyond the airlines which are now the mainstay of the group.

Q: Any money mistakes you made along the way, that you would like to have back?

A: I can remember a number of occasions earlier in the history of Virgin when the bank manager came to see me on the Friday and told us he was going to close Virgin down on Monday morning. We would spend the whole weekend scrambling around to avoid going bankrupt and somehow would always find a way to keep going.

One of the most painful things I have ever had to do was sell Virgin Records to EMI. We did it to keep our other businesses, namely Virgin Atlantic, going.
People might say, 'Why were you upset when you'd just made $1 billion?'

We had built the company from scratch and just signed people like Janet Jackson and The Rolling Stones. It was a sad day, but without it, we wouldn’t be where we are today.

Q: With your ballooning adventures, you came close to death more than once. What did those moments teach you about what is important in life?

A: I have had countless near-death experiences throughout my life, and I wouldn’t say any have deterred my appetite for adventure.

They have made me think about the type of risks I am willing to take, for my businesses and my family. My family mean the world to me. We are lucky to be a very close-knit group. I have recently had some extra responsibility in my life when I became a 'Grand-Dude.' I have enjoyed spoiling my grandchildren and love spending any spare time I have with them.

My family is an adventurous bunch. Holly, Sam, my nephew Noah and I just completed the Virgin Strive Challenge, traveling from the base of the Matterhorn to Mount Etna, entirely on human power.

I don’t think any true entrepreneur - or adventurer - would let a little risk of failure put them off.

(Editing by Lauren Young and G Crosse)
This article first seeen on reuters

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

The Most Expensive Spice in the World

Afghan women collect saffron flowers in the Karukh district of Herat, Afghanistan, November 5, 2016. Picture taken November 5, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Shoib
By Jalil Ahmad Razayee | HERAT, AFGHANISTAN
It is early morning in a saffron field outside the western Afghan city of Herat and dozens of women are harvesting the delicate purple flowers, working quickly to gather as many as they can before the sun gets too hot.

Saffron is the most expensive spice in the world, selling for as much as $1,200-$1,800 a kilogram, and has long been seen as an alternative crop to opium poppies for poor farmers in a country struggling with the legacy of decades of war and lawlessness.

So far, it has had little impact on the opium trade which the United Nations estimates is worth some $3 billion a year in Afghanistan, source of most of the world's opium, from which heroin is produced.

Even so, the Afghan saffron industry has grown and is establishing a reputation for quality in a market still dominated by neighboring Iran, which accounts for almost 90 percent of global production.

"There is a huge demand for Afghan saffron," said Bashir Ahmad Rashidi, head of the Ariana Saffron Company, which exports to countries from France to Turkey, India and the United States.

Just as importantly, it offers work for women whose employment opportunities are otherwise limited.

"We are very happy about saffron cultivation because it has paved the way for women to find jobs," said Khanum Rassoli, who leads a team picking flowers for Ariana Saffron. "...It's mostly women doing the harvesting and processing."

Known to have been cultivated in what is now Afghanistan at least 2,000 years ago, saffron is well suited to the dry climate, heavily labor intensive but requiring little sophisticated machinery or capital.
The harvest is a tricky operation that begins in October and lasts just three weeks before the flowers begin to die. Workers pick about 10 kg of flowers a day, earning some 25 afghani ($0.38) per kilo.

BRIGHT SPOT

Once the flowers are picked, tiny orange stigmas are separated by hand for drying with about 450,000 stigmas needed to produce just one kilogram of the sharp and fragrant spice, used for seasoning and coloring from southern Europe to South Asia.

Afghanistan produces around four tons a year, a figure dwarfed by the more than 200 tons Iran produces, but it is a rare bright spot in an economy struggling to get to its feet.

"Over the past two years, we've seen saffron having a good impact on the economy of families and our country," said Rashidi from his office in the ancient city of Herat.

The industry was revived by refugees returning from Iran in the 1990s and much work has gone into establishing Afghan saffron as an international brand.

However competition from Iran is fierce, reflecting the experience in other sectors where cheap imports pose a threat to the emergence of a strong local industry.
"We can find Iranian saffron in Herat saffron markets and I hope those who import Iranian saffron into Afghanistan think about the quality of Afghan saffron compared to Iranian saffron," Rashidi said.

The other challenge is opium, far and away Afghanistan's biggest export. Government programs and Western donors provide assistance but loosening the grip of drugs networks, including those run by Taliban militants, is a distant target.

However the World Bank estimates more than 6,000 farmers in Herat already produce saffron and the latest U.N. figures indicate that opium cultivation decreased in both Herat and neighboring Farah province last year.

Gul Ahmad, a farmer, said with more help, the industry will develop further.

"Saffron is better than poppy because poppy cultivation caused negative impacts on society and the young generation," he said. "Saffron is a legal business and it produces a good income."

(Writing by James Mackenzie; Editing by Nick Macfie)
This article first seeen on reuters